Potawatomi Language

Until the 1840s, Potawatomi was spoken around Lake Michigan. It is currently spoken in Oklahoma, Kansas, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Michigan. Potawatomi is a member of the Central Algonquian branch of the Algic language family. The most closely related Algonquian language is Ojibwe, but as the result of contact, Potawatomi shares some linguistic features with Shawnee, Meskwaki, Kickapoo, Myaamia, Cree, and Menominee.

Selected Language Information

Gailland, Maurice. (nd). English-Potawatomi Dictionary. Jesuit Missouri Province Archives, Reel nos. 47-49. Jesuit Catalog nos. NA14, NA15 and NA21. Vatican Film Library, St. Louis University.

Gailland, Maurice. 1868. Grammar of the Potawatomi Language. Jesuit Missouri Province Archives, Reel no. 47, Jesuit Catalog no. NA11. Vatican Film Library, St. Louis University.

Hockett, Charles Francis. 1939. Potawatomi Syntax. Language. Vol. 15: 4. 235-248.

Hockett, Charles Francis. 1948a. Potawatomi I: Phonemics, Morphophonemics, and Morphological Survey. International Journal of American Linguistics. Vol. 14: 1. 1-10.

Hockett, Charles Francis. 1948b. Potawatomi II: Derivations. International Journal of American Linguistics. Vol. 14: 2. 63-73.

Hockett, Charles Francis. 1948c. Potawatomi III: The Verb Complex. International Journal of American Linguistics. Vol. 14: 3. 139-149.

Hockett, Charles Francis. 1948d. Potawatomi IV: Particles and Sample Texts. International Journal of American Linguistics. Vol. 14: 4. 213-225.

Hockett, Charles Francis. 1987. The Potawatomi Language: A Descriptive Grammar. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms International.

Neely, Justin. 2010. Conversational Potawatomi. Shawnee, OK: Citizen Potawatomi Nation.

Sample Archival Materials in the Native American Languages Collection

Links

Citizen Potawatomi Nation - Language Resources

Hannahville Indian Community Department of Culture, Language and History

Potawatomi Dictionary

Catalogue of Endangered Languages

Glottolog

OLAC

Ethnologue